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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 122 (some duplicates have been removed)
don't want to be the person that denies it. there's too much science. there was a moment in the early 90s and that was when i had my first kid. i mean, this is really selfish, you know. i had my first kid and i thought, oh, my gosh. i started learning about what was really going on. they talked about greenhouse. remember, the time magazine said, "what is the greenhouse effect?" there was a moment where we were all really motivated and then i don't know what happened. personally, i think the oil companies and i think that a lot of people whose pockets are lined by them just devastated that conversation. tavis: what do you think it is gonna take for that conversation to get traction with everyday american people? i say the average american because it is not like these issues aren't discussed. it is not like people, you know, can't feel that something in the environment -- whether you understand global warming or climate change or not, it is pretty hard to deny that the weather patterns are changing. i mean, your regular joe can tell that something is happening. >> oh, yeah. ranchers are
ensure that rules are based on good data and sound science. third, we are going to see -- you're going to see a significant respond to expand the expertise of our law firm, the national chamber litigation center. and in other areas of our institution in order to deal with expanding regulation. our preference is always to work within the legislative and regulatory process. and we do that on a daily basis, but when rights have been trampled on, our regulators have overstepped their bounds, well, we will then just take necessary legal action. now let me turn to something we should all care about any very important way, that's immigration reform. america has grown because we have attracted and welcome some of the most talented and the hard-working citizens of the world to our shores. immigrants teach in our universities. they invest and invent in our technological companies. they staff our hospitals. they care for our elderly and our young. they harvest our food and they serve in our armed forces. given are changing demographics, we need more workers to sustain our economy. support our ret
medal of science. tim tooten is live in the newsroom with that story. big news for him, sam. >> he is a distinguished professor of physics, but his resume also includes a seat on the state board of education. the national medal of science from the white house is one of the highest honors given to scientists, engineers, and inventors. dr. gates is the author of more than 200 publications. he has been a member of the state school board since 2009. he says it is a nice surprise. >> the personal meaning i take from it is in order to get this sort of recognition, some of the world's best physicists had to support the research program i had been pursuing. that kind of affirmation -- you cannot put a price on a. >> he will be honored at the white house in a ceremony later this year. dr. gates received his degrees and ph.d. from mit. he has done postgraduate work at harvard and caltech. tim tooten, wbal tv-11 news. >> coming up, another staff choice on capitol hill. >> president obama's nomination for treasury secretary. >> different, emotional approaches to saturday's showdown. later in s
.com. i don't know if it is a science or running the data. whatever it is, i want to talk about it. i had no idea you were bringing this in. >> it is the real thing. they rarely go up for sale. only oscars made before 1950 can be bought and sold. this is from 1946. it is anna and the king of siam, best set decoration. it was up for best picture and wind on to inspire "the king and i." >> why would anyone want to sell the oscar? >> in this case, it was the grandson. his grandfather had won several and he wanted to dispose of one of them. bill murray, i was very upset there was no mention of bill murray. >> it is delightful. >> he is amazing. am i out of it. did i expect he was going to be nominated? >> a lot of jaw-dropping a-listers. there was no. there were a lot more stars like quvenzhane. she is the best star. >> i asked, was this a big deal for you. was it ever? >> i asked her, do you have your acceptance speech ready for the oscars. she said, i'm still working on it. >> did she really say that, nine years old. she is going to be a big hit. >>> apart from the snubs, no real surprise t
is the continued united states pre-eminence, not just in demand space programs but in terms of science and inventions and everything else that goes along with it, and it ended up being washed away in the flood of stimulus france. as this hearing has highlighted already, the president's approach to human spaceflight lacks a clear mission and he is relying on the success of commercial space, which i agreed is vital that has dragged its feet and pushed its flight at nasa. i strongly support a public-private partnership for the country's space policy. however, it is up to nasa to develop the heavy lift rocket because the private sector doesn't have enough funds to do it by itself, and that heavy lift rocket needs enough thrust to overcome the administration shortsightedness. now why cancel inhofe, the international partners who supported the mission, president obama has taken a been there and done that approach but we haven't been there for 40 years and the international partners who would have helped us have never been there. if we cannot lead the world with space, china and russia will i
of a classroom or a building? >> it was inside of the science building, but i don't know if it was in a classroom or a hall way. i don't have that information. >> was it mid-class? >> i don't know. it was sometime this morning. i'm not sure what time it was this morning or if they were in a classroom or a hall way between classes. i don't know. >> just to confirm, one victim, the one student injured, airlifted to a hospital. one single injury? >> that's the information that we have at this point, yes. >> i know this is very, very early, but any connection between the student who was shot and the student shooter? >> we don't have information on that at this point. >> final question of other schools in the area on lockdown? what's the status? >> that i don't know. i don't know if we lockdown the other schools in the taft area or not. >> ray pruitt from the kern county sheriff's department. we thank you so much for calling in. give us a call back if you hear anything else. that is new information we got from this school shooting. the fact that the shooter was a student and used a shotgun. this happe
award. during school time i like learning math and science, because my teacher uses chinese to explain. if the teachers didn't teach my cousins and my sisters and me how to speak chinese, we wouldn't be able to speak in restaurants. once again, thank you. [applause] [speaking foreign language] >> good evening, everyone, i am winnie chi, i am the body president of alice fong yu, this is like a second home to me. the teachers and my friends support me and they make me feel special. and also staff members and teachers guarantee that we have a safe environment to learn. and they make us feel comfortable and safe to share our feelings. i enjoy math and science, because the teachers teach us in chinese. and they teach us step by step. i am proud to be a student at alice fong yu. thank you. [speaking foreign language] [applause] >> hello, everyone, i am maze. i a seventh grader at alice fong yu, and i am peer mediator. afy is an amazing school. the chinese i learned there has been helpful in so many situations. if not for me being able to speak chinese, i would not be able to communicate with
and in social science and psychology that saying that, so that's an important distinction so thank you both so much. >> and there is that and -- there's a balance between -- i mean when i hear that bullying is going down i mean all of us should rejoice because that to me is indicative of the fact of the work in communities across the country are starting to pay off, but it's going to be hard in this ark and we are in this area and people are coming forward, kids are coming forward . suicides that would have been kept forward or not reporting and we're learning thanks to rapid fire and thanks to social networking or facebook and this is a sued -- all of this the -- the volume of bullying is going to rise in proportion with i think the actual drop in occurrences so to balance that and be aware of that i think is important. >>i totally agree, and that's really to rosylyn's point about this being a very, very important moment and we need to did it right. just on the subject of suicide the surgeon general came out this week and there was a usa today story and suicide and especially among veterans
colbert's mind last night. now neil, one of the most popular science writers of our time takes us for a wild ride through the universe here on "the cycle." >> you have said i'm related to a fish, right? >> oh, yeah. the challenge here is taking it to rocks and planets and stellar processes and the big bang. itsd the unity of all physical entities in the world. >> can you get me $5 worth of whatever it is? sometimes what we suffer from is bigger than we think ... like the flu. with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tamiflu is prescription medicine for treating the flu in adults and children one year and older whose flu symptoms started within the last two days. before taking tamiflu tell your doctor if you're pregnant, nursing. have serious health conditions, or take other medicines. if you develop an allergic reaction, a severe rash, or signs of unu
, celeste ward gventer, thank you. >> thank you so much, judy. >> thank you. >> brown: next, a science and medical story involving research from the frontiers of robotics. ray suarez looks at how doctors are using high tech toys to help people with special needs. >> what's your favorite game? >> "mario cart," the original. >> reporter: in a carefully monitored session that seems more like playtime than therapy, researchers at the university of notre dame have enlisted an unusual therapist to assist their studies of children with autism, a two foot robot named kelly. >> i got to skip school today, because of you guys. >> that is so cool. i am so glad. >> reporter: kelly is working with 11 year old liam mcguire and a co-therapist of the human kind, kristen wier. >> for liam, kelly has become a friend. i mean, he's very excited to see her. you can tell, he lights up when he sees kelly, he leans forward, his posture changes, his eye contact is much stronger. i think it's something he can relate to, and feel successful with. >> i like to play soccer. >> reporter: robots, like this one are b
learning to bubble in a multiple choice response. it is not literature, science, innovation, or creativity. it is not innovation. we need rigor and imagination. you need both. you have the left hand and the right hand. we have to combine those things. in california, we create innovation by ab32, but the only state with the cap and trade program, we create it by cutting regulation. i had to fire two incumbent people in our division of conservation. there were blocking oil exploration. i fired them and the oil permits for drilling went up 18%. we have to work on many levels. we're promoting efficiency. we're promoting and renewable energy and climate change -- i take courage change very seriously. we have got to do with it and there is a lot of resistance. but we deal with that through enlightened government policies, feedback, and changing them when we find they do not work. and encouraging the private sector where the ideas come up. i do not think -- steve jobs working in his career came up with stuff. i did not know that steve jobs was working in that group on the computer. we want to hav
can schedule an update with our behavioral sciences unit. i know that we've had -- they came before us. i know the chief has augmented that unite significantly. but we want to hear from them and see how things are going. i know we've had some issues within the department recently and we want to address that. >> also dr. gayle martin will be 7 and at scottish rights temple on february 8. he gives a fabulous case on suicide prevention and the stresses on law enforcement. >> president mazzucco: we did receive that e-mail today and it's open to the commissioners if you want to attend. we had a very good meeting with mary dunnigan's group and if we can have kelly dunn present. these are issues that involved the community and the department so i would like an update on that. >> i second that getting an update from the behavioral science unit because i remember last year we worked on this and we had a couple of recommendations. the chief was very supportive and i'm curious about how all of the recommendations have panned out, how it's been implemented. i definitely feel very sad for the offic
of the game, is it really worth it? >> reporter: seau's family donated his brain to science. the national institute of health found evidence of shrunken and hardened brain cells like these, tell-tale signs of chronic traumatic encephalopathy. >> all concurred with the diagnosis of cte. >> reporter: it can be a lethal chain of events. chronic blows to the head, including concussions, can cause cte. the symptoms include dementia, mood swings and depression severe enough to leave to suicide. >> the combination of depression and lack of impulse control probably contributes to the suicide that we see in this group of individuals. >> reporter: researchers at have documented 50 football players stricken by cte, 35 of them nfl players, six high school players. >> cte is not being seen in individuals without repetitive head injury in our experience, >> reporter: today's revelation about the toughest among them has some in the nfl questioning their own health. >> the times i do forget things, the sleepness nights you may have, you start to wonder, are you down that path towards cte? >> reporter: th
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: as unemployment, growth and budget concerns continue, the man who will lead president obama's new economic team was formally nominated today. the announcement came this afternoon, the latest in a series of major cabinet changes. >> one reason jack has been so effective in this town is because he is a low-key guy who prefers to surround himself with policy experts rather than t.v. cameras. >> brown: with that, the president introduced his nominee to be the next secretary of the treasury, jack lew, the man he made his chief of staff, a year ago yesterday. lew would succeed tim geithner, who drew fulsome praise from the president. >> when the history books are written tim geithner's going to go down as one o
in science today -- answers hidden in the cousins of cuba's painted snails. interpreter: cuba is known as the paradise of snails. many live here in this area and nowhere else. they have fascinated me since i was a student. and i like them because of their lifestyle -- so free, so relaxed, so interesting. narrator: in one of the most remote regions in cuba biologist emma palacios lemagne is cracking the mysteries of evolution. cuba doesn't provide emma with much money for her research and can't supply her with expensive equipment. but what cuba does give her is one of the most extraordinary laboratories on earth. instead of test tubes, emma uses mammoth limestone karsts called mogotes. centuries of erosion have carved them into towering island worlds a virtual galapagos, where, like darwin's finches emma's snails evolve in extreme isolation. the snails on these separated hills never venture more than 60 feet from home, making this the ideal place for emma to discover how their shapes, colors and behaviors are dictated by the land. interpreter: each slope on these mogot
that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: as unemployment growth and budget concerns continue, the man who will lead president obama's new economic team was formally nominated today. the announcement came this afternoon, the latest in a series of major cabinet changes. >> one reason jack has been so effective in this town is because he is a low-key guy who prefers to surround himself with policy experts rather than t.v. cameras. >> brown: with that, the president introduced his nominee to be the next secretary of the treasury, jack lew, the man he made his chief of staff, a year ago yesterday. lew would succeed tim geithner, who drew fulsome praise from the president. >> when the history books are written tim geithner's going
to lake setments. lakes slowly fill with mud and a very sophisticated science you can reconstruct environmental histories going back in time. this is the 1920s and 1800's and look at past pollution levels preserved in the archive like a history book in the bottom of a lake. >> say that pollution levels right now are low, but you think they're going to go up over time but it strikes me even in the example you were just talking about and in saying they're low you're comparing them to a pristine environment that was the wilderness but the level you're finding are lower than what we would find in most cities. >> right now, well these are wilderness lakes we should say. these lakes are anywhere from 30 kilometers or sorry, 60 miles to 60 miles away from the major source. you have to fly into e lakes typically with a helicopter or something. they're not right no the oil sand operation. what is i think important to say, if you look at our most polluted site, which is about 15 miles let's say approximately from the major operation, if you look at that, that current levels would find in a
depend on it. chief science correspondent, robert bazell. >> we have more ahead on nbc bay area, a new screening test that will detect one of the hardest to detect cancers in women. >> and at 6:00, a man in prison for more than a decade after stealing $100,000 worth of merchandise from a store, he is now free and how he is making the most of his second chance. >> remember to layer. see you at 6:00. >> it will be cold. >>> on our broadcast tonight, in the fight. one american city has now declared a full-on flu emergency as deaths from the illness increase and hospitals try to keep up. early detection. big new hope tonight in the fight against ovarian cancer. the deadliest form for women. there has been a big development. >>> rules of the road. how far can police officers go when they pull you over? the story could have a big impact for allf us on the road. >>> and fallen stars. lance armstrong set to open up to oprah as the hall of fame door is shut on some baseball greats tainted by the steroid controversy. "nightly news" begins now. >>> from nbc news world headquarters in new york, th
already get routinely. our report tonight from our chief science correspondent, robert bazell. >> reporter: the experimental test could revolutionize early detections for two major women's cancers. uterine, which kills 8,000 women a year in this country. and ovarian, which kills 15,000. >> this has the potential to fill in a niche where there is no effective screening test. >> reporter: linda defino has stage 3 ovarian cancer. doctors found it only because she felt a fullness in her abdomen, a symptom women often ignore. >> i started to feel this strange feeling that i just knew wasn't right. >> reporter: she is undergoing 18 weeks of chemotherapy. doctors have long been searching for a test to find ovarian cancer early, when it is far more easily treated. >> when ovarian cancer is found at stage 1, the cure rate is 85 to 90%. >> reporter: to develop the new test, the scientists at johns hopkins started with a familiar pap smear that looks for abnormal cells that become cervical cancer. the pap test has saved millions of lives around the world. the hopkins researchers found that cancerous
is a big deal. getting the kids in school today studying the sciences and technology and engineering and the math to stay in this country and getting a path to his citizenship and dealing with the competencies' to grow jobs. if you can deal with those issues, we would be off to a great start. >> you have many of your clients in the manufacturing business. looking at the broader economic shift, what do you do in a post- manufacturing world to provide the numbers of jobs that america needs? because it does not appear clear yet. >> we have roughly 12 million jobs through the great recession lost. we have filled about half of those. it will still take some more between five-seven years to get unemployment down to the 5% range. and you are right, the skill sets are starting to move. it will have to be able to move with that prepared the first that -- we will have to be able to move with that. the first up is immigration reform and job training. >> you are a guide in ohio and you have lost your job at a car plant and you are 55 years old. immigration reform will not help you much, is it? >
anymore, but -- galileo academy of science and technology. we are so very proud of you today. wherever you go, let the young people know from -- to city hall, that you have arrived today. let them know where you went to school today so they can have hope. my younger sisters, cohen, kim, you're always there. where's the opera house? we thank you. hbcu. that makes my heart happy. this commissioners would not be sitting here today, former commissioner mar, former commissioner jane kim, now supervisor. former commissioner norman yee. no supervisor. you give our people hope. i will say that malia cohen, would be the next president of the board of supervisors. supervisor kennedy and doris ward, they showed you what to do. good luck and god bless each of you. >> my name is michael -- i want to say welcome to the class of 2013. congratulations for making yourself available and here at city hall. second, i want to point out that two of the nominees need to have a legislative aide if they will be board president, if malia cohen and jane jim would need a third legislative aide. second, all three
issues. gang violence and brain science and crime, these are issues at the forefront and deserve all of our attention. this is a greatat>> your going p with me because i liked to wander around and see faces. you have learned more about me that a lot of people know. for the last 10 years i have been married to someone who was a deputy chief of the lapd and i now refer to him as being in recovery. at the same time, i have been working extensively with home with industries, and my brother said, if he had dreamed i would be married to a policeman and working with a priest, somebody would be lying. i have been working with gangs and been involved with gangs, trying to figure them out for 34 years. i began as a young social worker in south los angeles. with gang infested housing projects that are now almost mythic, jordan downs and nickerson gardens, and i worked in these projects during what is referred to as the decade of death, when crack and unregulated gun availability laid waste to communities of color. in los angeles during the late 1980's and early 1990's, there were 1000 homicides
: supporting nova and promoting public understanding of science. and the corporation for public broadcasting, and by pbs viewers like you. this nova program is available on dvd. to order, visit shoppbs.org, or call 1-800-play-pbs. nova is also available for download on itunes. captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org available now on shoppbs downton still stands. i'm looking forward to all sorts of things. what?! no one must know! i'm warning you... to order, visit shoppbs. also available on itunes. coyle: john bates. i read this character, and there was something... i was drawn to him as much by what he didn't say as by what he did. i thought what he concealed was as interesting as what he revealed a kind of stoicism-- something very old-fashioned but also something quite mysterious as well. there's an element of mystery there. it's all about survival. he survived not losing his job. he survived the return of his wife. and he's now surviving prison, so it's about survival for bates. there are moments of reprieve. falling in love with ann
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. in the middle of the night it can be frustrating. it's hard to turn off and go back to sleep. intermezzo is the first and only prescription sleep aid approved for use as needed in the middle of the night when you can't get back to sleep. it's an effective sleep medicine you don't take before bedtime. take it in bed only when you need it and have at least four hours left for sleep. do not take intermezzo if you have had an allergic reaction to drugs containing zolpidem, such as ambien. allergic reactions such as shortness of breath or swelling of your tongue or throat may occur and may be fatal. intermezzo should not be taken if you have taken another sleep medicine at bedtime or in the middle of the night or drank alcohol that day. do not drive or operate machinery until at least 4 hours after taking intermezzo and you're fully awake. driving, eating, or engaging in other activities while not fully awake without remembering the event the next day have been reported. abnorm
dean of biological science it's university of chicago. [cheers and applause] you are known for your 2004 discovery of so-called missing link between fish and land animals, the fossil. which we've had on the show. he's a great guy. [ laughter ] okay. your new book is called "the universe within: discovering the common history of rocks, plan thes and people." what are you talking about? >> [ laughter ] what common. i'm not related to a plant, okay? i'm in the related to -- >> you absolutely are. >> stephen: i am not, okay. [ laughter ] i have questionable uncles but -- not a ficus. why am i related to a plant? >> the evolution of life is baitsd on the shared similarities creatures have. we see that in the dna of every creature on the planet from microrobes to worms to trees to plants to she rubs to poison ivy to people. there's a shared history. >> stephen: is that because we all interbred on the arch? >> it's been about 3.5 billion years of proceed withing. >> stephen: about 6,000 years. [ laughter ] i don't mean to blow hole until your theory there. the evidence might say otherwise
's brickleberry, statistically 458 of >> stephen: tonight, science finds the key to a long, healthy life. whatever it is, i bet it tastes good fried. [ laughter ] then, controversy over the new bin laden film. they shouldn't have let him do his own singing. [ laughter ] and my guest, chris kluwe, is an nfl punter and gay rights advocate. wow, pretty brave for an nfl player to admit he's a punter. [ laughter ] jimmy kimmel starts in his new 11:35 time slot tonight. but since he's my direct competition, i refuse to mention him. this is "the colbert report." captioning sponsored by comedy central ["the colbert report" theme music playing] [cheers and applause] thank you, ladies and gentlemen. welcome to the report. [crowd chanting see stephen] [cheers and applause] thank you, ladies and gentlemen. [cheers and applause] welcome to the report, folks. i have to thank you for that and i want to thank you for joining me in here, out there nation, we all know the economy's not in great shape. just today the dow dropped fifty five-- of whatever it is. [ laughter ] dow-lers. [ laughter ] so i was glad to hea
of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. or treat gas with these after you get it. now that's like sunblock before or sun burn cream later. oh, somebody out there's saying, now i get it! take beano before and there'll be no gas. >>> welcome. you made headlines recently talking about gun control. what is your view when you see these military-tile weapons in the hands of civilians? >> i made a career of carry be weapons. they fire a 556 round at about 3,000 feet per second and when it hits human flesh, it's devastating. it's designed to be that way. that's what i want soldiers to carry. but i don't want those weapons around our schools, i don't want them on our streets. if we can't -- it's not a complete fix to just address assault weapons but if we don't get very serious now when we seeing children being buried, then i can't think of a time when we should. >> you don't buy the argument that the only good answer to a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun? >> i don't. and i think it's a time we have a serious discussion and not an eit
science and evidence based drug and alcohol treatment center. where your addiction stops and your new life begins. call now. >>> our fifth story "outfront," shut out by the baseball hall of fame. barr bonds, roger clemens and sammy sosa, all of whom faced accusations of steroid use, were not inducted. only the eighth time that no new player was added. "outfront" tonight, tom berducci. he's the guy who made the decision. i spoke to him and asked him who he voted for. >> tom, sorry, i want to start with barry bonds. 762 home runs, more than anyone else ever. 1,196 rbis. in 2001, a record 73 home runs, more than anyone else ever. the only seven-time mvp in baseball. did you vote for him to join the hall of fame? >> i did not vote for him. it's funny you read off those numbers. i don't even need to know because he was this good. one of those you said that's a hall of famer. well, a hall of fame career, perhaps, but the choice he made to use performance enhancing drugs, to me, that does not define a hall of famer. >> roger clemens, 354 wins, 4, 672 strikeouts, the only seven-time cy young winne
it happened in the science building. the suspect apparently entered with a shotgun and shot another stunt. that student was flown, med-evacked to bakersfield 25, miles away to a hospital. no word on the injuries there was a second injured person as well, a teacher. no idea what the injuries were. the teacher refuse treatment on scene, maybe because there were grazed or a scuffle. the good news is that the suspect is in custody, and the student who was shot has been taken to a hospital where they're being treated at this hour. >> shepard: interestingly, some of the first reporting came from kids on their phones. reporter: yeah. in fact we got them, too. we jumped on to twitter and right away there were tweets coming from students at the high school -- at least we believe they were students at the high school -- local media said that's were getting phone calls from students, students were alerting each other via text messages, tweets, some were hiding in closets, some went to the football field. and you can see from the pictures, students got out and away from the science building because t
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> our second story, another high profile woman steps aside. the president's secretary resigned, one of eight women and her resignation comes the same day an image caught our attention "the new york times." this shows, this is why i said the frame. like the frame of the picture. the president is meeting with his top advisers. now, valerie jarrett is in that picture. hold it up. do you see her? i see a lot of white guys, but if you take a closer look, you can see a portion of her leg, wow, really? whoever found that works hard. okay. there's that guy's butt and her leg. now, the picture was taken about two weeks ago, but shortly after the picture was published, this was the white house photo of the day. the president and his senior advisers. three women in the picture, all very visible. "outfront" tonight, charles blow and former pentagon official, rosa brooks. charles, let me start on this first hilda solis resigning. there's always a lot of turnover. there's one fewer woman in the cabinet.
to have an absolute number. this is still relatively emerging science. a couple years ago, we weren't hardly talking about this. we do seem to know that the more hits to the head, the worse, which would make sense. the earlier they start, the worse it is. i saw evidence of this in a person who was 17 years old, carol. it can be quite significant. you see again the impact of those hits to the head, the swelling, the inflammation that can sometimes occur in the brain. a setup to the cte. >> so i'm going to ask you a question maybe you don't know the answer to. the nfl, it says it is addressing this problem. is it addressing it effectively? >> it is hard to say. i think there has been some rule changes now to take away some of the most dangerous parts of the game. i think they have focused a lot on concussions specifically. if someone has a concussion, they are more likely to stay out of the game and get a sideline game. >> you are a football fan. you watch these sub con sus sieve hits. the guy bounces back up, seemingly no problems. it is those things, accumulating over time, that pro
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 122 (some duplicates have been removed)